Developed in Birmingham

Workshops, live performance and exhibitions
Developed in Birmingham continues throughout August

 

 

·         Developed in Birmingham celebrates early photography in the city.

·         Workshops, live performance and exhibitions continue throughout August.

·         Last chance to see Thresholds, a virtual reality exhibition by Mat Collishaw, runs until 6th August.

 

Developed in Birmingham celebrates early photography in the city, devised by curator and photographic historian Pete James and artist Jo Gane with workshops, live performances and exhibitions continuing throughout August.

 

This week is your last chance to see Thresholds, a virtual reality artwork by Mat Collishaw at the Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Conceived and developed by Mat Collishaw and Pete James, Thresholds restages one of the earliest exhibitions of photography which took place in 1839 when British scientist William Henry Fox Talbot presented his photographic prints to the public at King Edward’s School in Birmingham. The experience is fully immersive with visitors walking freely through a digitally reconstructed room with a soundscape which includes the sound of demonstrations of the Chartist protesters who rioted in 1839 on the streets of Birmingham. Alongside the exhibition visitors can view rare archive material from The King Edwards Foundation Archive as well as a series of new works by sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker.

 

 A White House on Paradise Street by Jo Gane in collaboration with Pete James and Leon Trimble at BOM (Birmingham Open Media) runs until 19 August. The exhibition is inspired by the absence of what has been claimed by some writers to be the first photographic image made in Birmingham, and potentially the first image made in England using the daguerreotype photographic process*. Now missing, the image is said to have depicted a White House on Paradise Street, and is thought to have been made by George Shaw in late August or early September 1839.

 

In response to research by Pete James, the exhibition places small time machine camera devices around the city in locations relevant to key moments and events in the early history of photography in Birmingham. These devices are constructed using historic techniques in mahogany by master cabinetmaker Jamie Hubbard, to resemble the Wolcott daguerreotype camera patented in 1840.


Artist Leon Trimble has used Raspberry Pi micro computers to enable them to live stream analogue images from inside the camera back into the gallery space and online. To get hands on experience of how this technology works, join Leon for a workshop on 10 August at Waterstones, Birmingham.

 

On 16 August, members of the public can tune into the live stream either from the Paradise Street website (www.paradisestreet.co.uk) or at BOM as the cameras reveal characters from the 1840s interacting within the contemporary cityscape.

 

Artist Pete Ashton will transform Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery’s studio over 6 days from 7 – 12 August inviting visitors to the gallery to trace a portrait of their friends and family and learn about the history of photography. On Saturday 19 August Pete Ashton will also lead a one-off workshop for young people, inviting them to get involved in rethinking photography and hacking cameras at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Children and their families can join artist Melanie King and Birmingham Camera Obscura and take part in a giant cyanotype / sun print workshop on 29 August at Millennium Point using a selection of objects and a giant piece of fabric.

 

If that’s not enough, look out for Wolcott, our Big Sleuth Bear, hanging around Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery! Wolcott, is adorned with a collaged coat which celebrates the history of photography in Birmingham. Decorated with images relating to the city’s rich history of image making, he is a totem of this summer’s season of photography themed exhibitions events and activities.

 

Pete James, Artistic Director for Developed in Birmingham said: “Our season of events and exhibitions celebrates Birmingham’s incredible role in the development of photography both in terms of the processes pioneered here through to the first photographs and exhibitions. To-date thousands of people have participated in events or visited the exhibitions running as part of our programme, it is fantastic to see people taking another look at their city in relation to photography.”

 

Jo Gane, Artistic Director for Developed in Birmingham added: “There really is something for everyone during August, from budding young photographers to established artists looking to expand their knowledge of those first processes and photographs taken right here in Birmingham. There are opportunities for people to get involved both in person and online and I am particularly looking forward to the live stream from A White House on Paradise Street on 16 August.”

 

Developed in Birmingham has been made possible by funding from Arts Council England, University of Birmingham, Argentea Gallery and Millennium Point and is supported by BOM (Birmingham Open Media), Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and neighbouring development, Paradise.


Full event details will be available on the Developed in Birmingham website: www.developedinbirmingham.com

Twitter: @DevelopedInBham 

Facebook: /developedinbham  

 

FULL LISTINGS

 

A White House on Paradise Street
17 June – 19 August 2017
Wednesday — Saturday, 12—5pm
Exhibition

BOM (Birmingham Open Media), 1 Dudley Street, Birmingham B5 4EG
Free, no booking required. www.bom.org.uk

Jo Gane in collaboration with Pete James and Leon Trimble.

This project is inspired by the absence of what has been claimed by some writers to be the first photographic image made in Birmingham, and potentially the first image made in England using the daguerreotype photographic process*1. Now missing, the image is said to have depicted a White House on Paradise Street, and is thought to have been made by George Shaw in late August or early September 1839.

This new artwork by Jo Gane in collaboration with photographic historian Pete James and digital artist Leon Trimble combines historic and contemporary techniques to extend the latent possibilities of this missing image.

In response to research by Pete James, the exhibition places small time machine camera devices around the city in locations relevant to key moments and events in the early history of photography in Birmingham. These devices are constructed using historic techniques in mahogany by master

cabinetmaker Jamie Hubbard, to resemble the Wolcott daguerreotype camera patented in 1840. Leon Trimble has used Raspberry Pi’s to enable them to live stream analogue images from inside the camera back into the gallery space and online.

As time machines, these devices mine the contemporary landscape to make visible the history of the city’s role as the ‘midwife to the birth of photography’*2 in the early 19th Century.

Alongside the live streams of indistinct, soft images from within the camera devices reminiscent of even earlier attempts to produce photographic images a series of sharp, detailed new Daguerreotypes by Jo Gane produced at Mike Robinson’s Century Darkroom render fragments of what may have been visible on Shaw’s original Daguerreotype plate into focus within this new digital landscape, inspired by fragments of the past.

*1 Daguerreotypes are one of the first methods of making a photograph invented in August 1839 by Louis Daguerre in Paris, using a highly polished sheet of silver plated copper which is made light sensitive by fuming over iodine then developed with hot mercury before gilding with a gold chloride solution to produce one-off images that appear as if they are a ‘mirror with a memory’.

*2 from Birmingham Reminisces (Second Series) ‘The Pioneers of Photography in Birmingham,’ Birmingham Daily Mail, 28 January 1880.

 

Thresholds
24 June – 6 August 2017
Exhibition

Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Chamberlain Square, Birmingham B3 3DH
Visit www.birminghammuseums.org.uk to book tickets.

Using the latest in virtual reality technology, Thresholds will restage one of the earliest exhibitions of photography in 1839, when British inventor William Henry Fox Talbot presented a large display of his photographic prints to the public at King Edward's School, Birmingham.

The experience will be a fully immersive portal to the past; visitors will walk freely throughout a digitally reconstructed room, and be able to touch the bespoke vitrines, fixtures and mouldings; even the heat from a coal fire will be recreated. A soundscape for Thresholds will include the sound of demonstrations of the Chartist protesters who rioted in 1839 on the streets of Birmingham, and who can be glimpsed through the digital windows.

The original 19th Century exhibition, staged to coincide with the Annual Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, celebrated cutting edge technological innovation. Unfortunately, Fox Talbot’s original images have faded almost beyond recognition, with several of the surviving photographs existing only in light-proof vaults. Thresholds not only restages an important historical exhibition, but provides a way to view images that have since been lost.

Artist Mat Collishaw has worked with photographic historian Pete James; Paul Tennant from Nottingham University’s Mixed Reality Laboratory; respected authority on Fox Talbot, Larry Schaaf; Architect / Architectural Historian David Blissett; the team at VMI studios and The Whitewall Company, London amongst others to create this unique installation.

The project is supported by: Colmore Business District, Birmingham City University, King Edward's School, The Schools of King Edward's Birmingham, BOM (Birmingham Open Media), an Art Fund Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial Grant, the Owen Family Trust, IMI Charitable Trust, public funding via Kickstarter, Blain|Southern and the exhibition’s touring partners Somerset House, Lacock Abbey and Bradford Media Museum.

 

Raspberry Pi Workshop: Facial detection
Thursday 10 August 6-8pm

Waterstones, 24-26 High St, Birmingham B4 7S
£5/£3.50. Visit the Developed in Birmingham website to book.

This hands-on workshop will offer an insight into the technology behind the A White House on Paradise Street Wolcott web cams, with a particular focus on facial recognition technology. Although this workshop is aimed at those with some previous experience of the Raspberry Pi micro computer, beginners are welcome.

 

Live performance
Wednesday 16 August 1-2:30pm

Roaming/Virtual
Free. Visit the live stream link on the website on the day to view the event.  

Tune into the camera live streams across the city to reveal some characters from 1840s Birmingham interacting within the contemporary cityscape.

 

Speculative Cameras Workshop
19 August, 12-4pm

Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Chamberlain Square, Birmingham B3 3DH
£5/£3.50, Visit the Developed in Birmingham website to book.

A mix of computation and cardboard. From the camera obscura to artificial intelligence, join artist Pete Ashton to build and hack cameras.



Giant Cyanotype/Sun print Workshop
Tuesday 29 August 11.30am-1pm & 1-2.30pm

Millennium Point, Curzon St, Birmingham B4 7XG
£5/£3.50 Visit the Developed in Birmingham website to book.

Create a gigantic collaborative cyanotype print with artist Melanie King using a selection of objects and a giant piece of fabric.

 

Wolcott, The Big Sleuth Photo-Bear
July - September 2017

Look out for Wolcott, our Big Sleuth Bear, hanging around Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery!

See the Developed in Birmingham website and thebigsleuth.co.uk for details.

 

Developed in Birmingham has been made possible by funding from Arts Council England, University of Birmingham, Argentea Gallery and Millennium Point and is supported by BOM (Birmingham Open Media), Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and Paradise.